DT Materials

The D&T department offers students the opportunity to design and make their own products in a range of different materials using a variety of tools and equipment. Students study theory and develop their making skills through lots of interesting practical work. It is also an opportunity for them to apply the knowledge and techniques that they have developed in other core subjects into designing and developing practical solutions. Students analyse existing products to enhance their own designing. We are keen that students develop their ability to plan projects and present their work with clarity and impact. Our aim is that students enjoy highly productive lessons where they get to design and make quality products that they are proud to take home.

Year 7
Year 8
Key Stage 4
Engineering

What will my child learn about in DT Materials this year?

Discovery


Students will design and make a Ball Bearing Game, discovering the properties of materials and learning about processes they use to make it.  

Celebration


Students will complete a course on basic hand graphic skills and CAD. They will design a fridge magnet using CAD and the laser cutter. They will research products associated with different Celebrations.

Creativity


Students will plan and make a holder for a mobile phone in acrylic. They will design its top profile with creativity.

Balance


Students will further develop their ability to communicate ideas through sketching and modelling. They will consider how to achieve the correct balance of product proportions.

What type of homework will be set?

Research tasks into: existing similar products; relevant useful data; user needs. To be compiled on iPads.
The learning of: relevant materials; equipment; processes; and keyword spellings. To be tested prior to the Progress Tracking Point.
Writing of an iPad diary of the technology and making tasks completed during the course of an assignment.

How will my child be assessed in DT Food/Textiles this year?

Students will be assessed during and at the end of each of the four assignments. They will be given levels, feedback and targets for improvement to act upon to ensure good progress each time.
They will also be given a quick knowledge test for each unit of work prior to the Progress Tracking Point.

How can I support my child’s learning at home?

Encourage your child to research existing similar products at home as a point of inspiration for their own designing.
The product analysis and design tool, ACCESS FM, is a very important part of all areas of Design and Technology. It is an acronym for Aesthetics, Client, Cost, Environment, Safety, Size, Function, Materials, Manufacture and Maintenance. It guides students through analysis of existing products, the design process and evaluation of their work.
As in the real world of designers, we are constantly looking at a target market group to inspire and guide project outcomes. This can be supported further at home by acting as the client and answering questions and helping them to review and modify their ideas throughout the development stage.

Links & Resources

There are no further resources for this subject.

What will my child learn about in DT Materials this year?

Risk


Students will take design risks when they make an electronically controlled ornament. They will consider the risks associated with work in design and technology and the precautions necessary.

Interpretation


Students will explore electronic systems with computer simulation, and mechanisms with a short design and make activity. They will learn how to interpret system diagrams to create working models.

Identity


Students will design and make a desk tidy in natural timber and manmade board. They will design for a client and try to meet their needs and reflect their identity.

Structures


Students will learn about physical structures. In teams of three, they will design and test straw towers under increasing loads. They will also design and make a ping pong ball firing devices from a set amount of materials to compete in a competition.

What type of homework will be set?

  • Research tasks into: existing similar products; relevant useful data; user needs. To be compiled on iPads.
  • The learning of: relevant materials; equipment; processes; and keyword spellings. To be tested prior to the Progress Tracking Point.
  • Writing of an iPad diary of the technology and making tasks completed during the course of an assignment.

How will my child be assessed in DT Food/Textiles this year?

  • Students will be assessed during and at the end of each of the four assignments. They will be given levels, feedback and targets for improvement to act upon to ensure good progress each time.
  • They will also be given a quick knowledge test for each unit of work prior to the Progress Tracking Point.

How can I support my child’s learning at home?

Encourage your child to research existing similar products at home as a point of inspiration for their own designing.
The product analysis and design tool, ACCESS FM, is a very important part of all areas of Design and Technology. It is an acronym for Aesthetics, Client, Cost, Environment, Safety, Size, Function, Materials, Manufacture and Maintenance. It guides students through analysis of existing products, the design process and evaluation of their work.
As in the real world of designers, we are constantly looking at a target market group to inspire and guide project outcomes. This can be supported further at home by acting as the client and answering questions and helping them to review and modify their ideas throughout the development stage.

Links & Resources

What will I learn?

Students have the opportunity to build upon the work of KS3 and further develop their knowledge and practical skills through designing and making exciting quality products in a range of materials and disciplines. In Year 9, students will be able to work on a wide variety of design and make projects which will develop their knowledge of working with graphics, textiles, electronics, mechanisms, wood, plastic and metal using a wide range of equipment. In Year 10 they will be able to focus on an area of interest from the above list and complete a substantial design and make project as part of their coursework unit in Year 11.

Students will be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and designing and making skills through a range of enjoyable, fast-paced and challenging mini-projects using a wide range of materials and components safely.
  • Develop a creative approach to their design development and take calculated risks whilst using technical and practical expertise to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • Develop important skills in investigation, problem solving, decision making, planning, time management, resource organisation.
  • Use new technology - computer aided designing and manufacturing techniques (including laser cutting and 3D printing) to complement traditional hand tools and workshop machinery.
  • Develop skills to clearly communicate their ideas through annotation, sketching and 3D modelling.
  • Develop the ability to take into account design considerations and industrial practices.
  • Develop the skills to critically analyse, evaluate, test and refine their own ideas and final products.

Midway through Year 10 students will start their GCSE coursework project, completing a concise design folder, containing analysed research, development of ideas, planning and on-going evaluations. They will then manufacture the product and carry out tests and a final evaluation.

The final examination enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge within a design context set by the examination board.

How will I be assessed?

What's assessed

Paper 1
  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Designing and making principles

How it's assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Questions

  • Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks) A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.
  • Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks) Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.
  • Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks) A mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

What's assessed Practical application of:

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Designing and making principles

How it's assessed

  • Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30–35 hours approx.
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Task(s)

  • Substantial design and make task

Assessment criteria:

  • Identifying and investigating design possibilities
  • Producing a design brief and specification
  • Generating design ideas
  • Developing design ideas
  • Realising design ideas
  • Analysing & evaluating
  • In the spirit of the iterative design process, the above should be awarded holistically where they take place and not in a linear manner
  • Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA
  • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence
  • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by AQA

What could I move onto?

Students can study A Level Applied Engineering, A Level Product Design (3D Design) or A Level Product Design (Textiles) at KS5 and then go onto degrees and careers in one of a wide range of different Design, Engineering and Manufacturing disciplines. These include Product Design, Engineering, Electronics, Architecture, Fashion Design, Graphics, Media Design.

Links & Resources

Exam Board: AQA

Course title and type of qualification: Engineering GCSE (9 – 1)

What will I learn?

The sky’s the limit. Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags.

This new GCSE will introduce students to a host of new technologies, helping them to gain practical skills and understanding to inspire a lifelong interest in engineering. It will particularly appeal to those who enjoy being creative, with an affinity for drawing, design, Maths and problem-solving. In Year 9 you will complete a foundation course, which will prepare you for your GCSE assessed work. You will develop your engineering skills by undertaking focused practical tasks. This will involve getting a hand on experience of using the tools and equipment relevant to engineering, including the use of CADCAM (Computer Aided Design, Computer Aided Manufacture). You will work in a range of materials, to manufacture items using the Brazing Hearth, Hand tools, Lathe and Milling machine.

Students will also learn about:

  • Pneumatic and Mechanical Systems
  • Engineering Materials, including calculating Stress, Strain and failure points
  • Systems (Electrical, Mechanical and Pneumatic)
  • Testing and Investigation
  • Manufacturing processes
  • The impact of Modern Technologies.

What will I need to succeed?

To succeed in this course students should have:

  • An enjoyment of practical work and exploring different solutions in different contexts and materials.
  • An enjoyment of exploring ideas and modelling them using ICT as well as hands on construction.
  • Self-motivated and organised.
  • You need to be inspired and motivated to gain an insight into related sectors, such as manufacturing.
  • A good understanding of Science and Mathematical principles. (15% of the course will be about the theoretical and practical application of Mathematics in Engineering)

How will I be assessed?

Question paper: Externally assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 120 marks
  • 60% of GCSE

Sections 1–6 from the subject content. Though the 'Practical engineering skills' section will predominantly be assessed through the NEA, some questions in the written exam will relate to practical contexts and students will need to apply their understanding within these contexts.

Questions

  • Multiple choice questions assessing breadth of knowledge.
  • Short answer questions assessing in depth knowledge, including calculations.
  • Multiple choice questions related to the application of practical engineering skills.
  • Extended response questions drawing together elements of the specification.

Non-exam assessment: Practical engineering

  • A brief set by AQA released on 1 June in the first year of study.
  • 80 marks
  • 40% of GCSE

What's assessed

  • Application of skills, knowledge and understanding in a practical context.
  • Analysis and evaluation of evidence.

Questions Students produce:

  • engineering drawings or schematics to communicate a solution to the brief
  • an engineering product that solves a problem.

What could I move onto?

Students can study A Level Applied Engineering or A Level Product Design (3D Design) at KS5 and then go onto degrees and careers in one of a wide range of different Engineering disciplines. Engineering, Civil Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Structural Engineering, Architectural Engineering and lots more.

Links & Resources

Links & Resources

Abbey Grange C of E Academy

Butcher Hill
Leeds
LS16 5EA

Tel: 0113 275 7877
Fax: 0113 275 4784
info@abbeygrangeacademy.co.uk

Registered Office:

Abbey Multi Academy Trust
c/o Chapter House
Abbey Grange Church of England Academy
Butcher Hill
Leeds
LS16 5EA
Registered Company Number: 07705552

Links & Resources

Links & Resources

Links & Resources